Be Sunscreen Savvy this Summer

Be SunscreenSavvyThis Summer

Be Sunscreen Savvy the Summer

(tips by JB Organizing)

 

The most important things to remember:

  1. Use sunscreen no matter what.
  2. Keep it handy (in your car, sports bags, beach bag, diaper bag etc.) so you have it when you need it.  We often need it most when we weren’t planning on it.
  3. Teach your kids to use it and to apply it themselves.  
  4. Let your teens pick the kind they like.  If they like it they are more likely to use it.  
  5. Store all the sunscreen in one spot in your house (Condense 🙂 and label the bin that holds it.  Make it is easy to find, so people use it and you know what you have.  

How long should I keep my sunscreen?  3 years or until the listed expiration date

Article from Mayo Clinic

Should I leave sunscreen in the car?

Sunscreen will become less effective more quickly when repeatedly left in the hot car.  However, keep in mind if we are using sunscreen frequently as we should, then the bottle of sunscreen won’t last long enough for the effectiveness to change significantly anyway.   It is better to leave it in the car, and have it when you need it, then take it out and forget to bring it and not have it (It is not effective at all when you don’t have it with you!  🙂

Should my kid’s keep sunscreen in their sports bags?

Yes!  You want to do everything you can to encourage young people to apply sunscreen.  The first step is for them to have it with them when they need it.  Plus it works better with teens if they don’t have to ask Mom or Dad for it and can apply it when out and about.  

What kind of sunscreen is best?

Take into consideration age (baby vs. elderly) and type of skin (dark or light, greasy or dry)

Article from the Skin Cancer Foundation gives a great breakdown.

With teens – any sunscreen is better than none.  Get them the kind they like (smell they like etc.)  Take them to pick it out.  If they like it they are more likely to use it!

What level of sunscreen is best?

“Most dermatologists recommend SPF 30 for the average person, since it blocks about 97 percent of UVB rays. So is SPF 100 a superhero sunscreen that will defend you against that other 3 percent? Not exactly. As Leffell explains, “the higher you go on the SPF, the tinier the improvement in the UVB blockage.” For example, SPF 50 blocks about 98 percent of UVB rays. Anything higher provides no significant difference in protection, according to the FDA, which recently proposed to limit the maximum value as SPF 50+.” (US News and World Report Health article)

What Brand of sunscreen is best?

I have found that it varies on who you ask.  After viewing many different reports and articles, it really appears to be a matter of opinion.  You can get inexpensive ones and expensive ones and the importance seems to lie in the SPF and remembering to apply properly (covering all areas) and reapplying consistently.  Consumer Reports offers their opinion in this article.

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